(845) 669-6968

FAQs
Q. 1 Couldn’t a friend tape my event for me?
Ans.
Sure. He can cook your meal, take your photos, and perform plastic surgery for you as well. Don’t go there.
A good video flows smoothly from start to finish, using the best camera view 20at any given time while engaging the viewer’s attention and emotions. The difference between an amateur and a professional video production is very obvious. See our samples section for more information. People remember a quality production, and will want to see it over and over again.

Q. 2 Should we have our wedding recorded on video?
Ans.
Yes! Your Wedding is argueably the most significant event in your life. You should share it with friends and relatives who weren’t there and preserve it for future generations. Video can record character, personality and emotion in a way that still photos can not. You may never again have a gathering of all your family and friends the same way you do at your wedding. Your wedding video wil be eternal and priceless.

Q. 3 What cameras do you use?
Ans.
We use Professional broadcast quality video cameras. In fact, these same cameras are often used in the field by broadcasters and even movie production. A camera mounted on a tripod will give the most stable image during a ceremony. Monopods or hand-held cameras are most frequently used at receptions for the best angles on dancing and spontaneous action. Shooting with a moving camera in a live event without recording shaky video does require a skilled operator.

Q. 4 May I choose my own music for the video?
Ans.
Music during the ceremony and reception is typically the actual music you’ll hear in your video. You may however choose several selections for the introduction, montage segments, and end titles. Selections may be provided on CD, or via MP3 audio files.

Q. 5 Does the DVD include a chapter selection menu?
Ans.
Yes, each DVD has a custom scene selection menu, chapter markers are typically placed for the ceremony, first dance, toasts, cake cutting, and so on.

Q. 6 How are the vows recorded?
Ans.
We use a professional wireless microphone system for the recording of the vows. We also provide wireless handheld for the reception.

Q. 7 Are VHS copies available?
Ans.
Yes. These are $100each. We encourage DVD when possible, as it’s a superior format.

Q. 8 How long before I receive the completed DVDs?
Ans.
On average 8 weeks after the =date of your wedding. This varies somewhat, depending on the time of year, and current workload. It is also very important to give us the materials we need for editing (photos, song selection etc…) on time.

Q. 9 20What type of lights are used?
Ans.
We do not use additional lighting during the ceremony. Broadcast quality cameras require additional lighting only in dark environments. In these cases, the lighting has a softening screen applied, that functions much like a lampshade. The light is not harsh, and may easily be viewed directly. As your wedding day will be one of the most important days in your life, we go to great lengths to remain at a respectful distance, and make every effort to minimize our presence. Currently we use the best low-light HD cameras. There are no better =cameras available for your event.

Q. 10 Are all digital cameras alike?
Ans.
No. Small, 3-chip digital cameras were introduced in 1996 (models like the Sony VX-1000, Canon XL1, etc.). These cameras are vastly inferior to later models (Sony PD150/170, VX-2000/2100, DSR300/500, Canon XL2, JVC500, Panasonic 100/80, etc.). Now the reigning champions are HD. HD Cameras are much better in low light, and film in 1080p. An important thing to remember is that cameras are just tools, and art is in the hands of the artist.

Q. 11 Should I feed my Videographer?
Ans.
Well, not until the wedding day, of course, but the cost of one more meal will allow your Videographer to remain in your ballroom while eating. This makes him available for any spontaneous moment. Also, it never hurts to treat your vendors like guests. The stronger the bond, the more personal the work. You make the call.

Q. 12 How can we insure the best sound quality?
Ans.
Camera-mounted microphones are simply inadequate for good sound at a wedding ceremony. Generally a lapel mic is placed on the groom’s jacket, which is connected either to a recording device in his pocket or to a wireless transmitter that sends the sound to the camera. The bride, groom, and officiant normally stand close enough so that all three are recorded clearly. Any readings that take place should be covered by another microphone.

Q. 13 We’d like a professional-quality wedding video, but isn’t it too expensive?
Ans.
Advertised package rates for wedding videographers range from $700 for someone who has never done a wedding before, to $8000 for a high-definition video package with “everything and the kitchen sink”. Lower fees are possible if you have video for the ceremony only. The most popular packages seem to fall in the $2000 to $2500 range. In general the more expensive packages will involve more material (childhood photos, “before” preparations, etc.) and more editing time (more camera angles, highlights recap, musical montage). More than just the cost of equipment, you are paying for the onsite camera operating and postproduction editing skills needed to make a quality video production of your one time only event.

Q. 14 Should we get DVDs?How long does a DVD last?
Ans.
Video tapes are considered obsolete. DVDs – Bluray offer better video quality than tape, and can have menus and chapters for skipping directly to a particular segment of your video. Currently, most =videographers are delivering wedding videos on DVD discs. If you do not already have a DVD player, they are now available =for under $50. Since DVDs do not break or tangle like tape and there is no physical wear during playback, they are generally considered to be durable. In truth, no one really knows how long they will last, since the recordable DVD format has only been in wide use since 2001 but they are likely to be around much longer than you are. For now, the best advice is to get several copies, store theem properly, and ask your videographer if they will provide a replacement if needed.

Q. 15 How long is the completed DVD?
Ans.
This varies, as each wedding is unique. Dependant largely on the length of the ceremony, the final version will typically be approximately 90 minutes to 2 hours in length on average. Longer formal ceremonies will result in a longer video, and some will be 2-3 hours in length.